Effective Sales Management Performance

Why Sales Managers Hate Performance Management
Performance management can be a dirty job. Many managers shy away when having to deal with performance issues. My approach says “bring it on.” I believe that non-performing players need to get their act together or there is no place for them on the team. Here are a few considerations when addressing sales performance issues.

Opportunity Cost:
What happens when one of your sales people is not performing? Companies have set up a process for addressing performance issues. Some of these processes can take 3 -6 months to determine whether the sales rep can address their performance gaps or if not, are fired.

When addressing a reps performance, sales managers will use formal Performance Improvement Programs (PIP). These are formal procedural documents used to demonstrate that the manager is serious about a reps poor performance. The manager’s task is to document areas that require improvement if the rep is going to remain on the team.

Managing a PIP is time consuming and stressful. Much of the documentation is in the manager’s hands and of course there is added tension between the sales rep and manager. This results in strained communication and mutual lack of trust.

Focusing on a non-performing sales rep diverts a sales managers’ time from important activities, such as coaching reps with greater potential. Many sales managers do their best to be fair and give the rep a chance to prove themselves. They give the rep the benefit of the doubt and allow the PIP to drag on. We all know the opportunity cost in terms of lost sales as well as additional management time spent on the individual. As a rule, do not allow a PIP to linger for more than 3 months. Either the rep can perform or its time to part ways.

Stay Focused on the Desired Result
It is critical to assess the issues when dealing with poor performing sales reps. Depending if it is an attitude or effort issue, a decision needs to be made if the rep is to remain part of the team. I know HR must follow proper procedure, but if you have a bad apple you throw it out. You need to focus on the outcome that you think is right for the organization. Being very clear with what you want as the end result is required up front so you don’t waver through the process. Managing a 3-month PIP means determining if the rep is a player you want on your team and then managing that PIP effectively to achieve the outcome. If you believe the sales rep can pull up their performance then you give them the chance. It’s not about lying or deceit, it’s about making sure you have the right people on your team. Clarity will ensure that the process is seamless and effortless.

Enough with the Perpetual PIPers (PP)
We have all come across the PP. This is the sales rep that can do a high quality sales job but is not willing to put in the time or quantity of activity that would up their performance. I call them the “talented slacker”. They are content to meet annual sales objectives, but not exceed them.

The disparity arises when a new manager joins the team and their performance gaps become glaringly apparent in relation to their peers. The new sales manager gets tired of pushing the talented slacker to do more and eventually puts them on a PIP. Because the sales rep doesn’t lack the quality, they temporarily up their activity and thus satisfying the terms of the PIP.

Overtime the perpetual PIPers will fall back into their old habits until a new manager arrives and the process repeats itself. Once a rep is on a third PIP, I say 3 PIPs and you are out! The third PIP is a termination letter.

Be Proactive:
All your reps should be on a SIP! A SIP is a Sales Improvement Program. If you want to proactively manage performance, every sales rep in the organization should focus on at least one area of improvement to take their performance to the next level. Even your STARS have opportunities for improvement that can take them to a higher level of performance. You can call it a SIP or a coaching journey. Regardless, proactive sales managers are always looking to elevate the performance of each of their sales reps to maximize results.

Conclusion:
Every rep should be on a program as a means of improving their performance. Companies who are truly performance based should be focused on continual improvement from all their sales reps. If a rep is not performing you need to be clear, concise and expeditious when addressing a performance improvement program.

The 5 Ways Sales Managers Shoot Themselves in the Foot

Many sales managers have absolutely no idea how to be sales managers.

This isn’t entirely their fault. Many sales managers are emulating the exact same behaviors that their (bad) sales managers showed them. Many sales managers are sales reps who just got promoted out of their field of expertise entirely.

But of course the success of your company depends on your sales team. It’s important for all sales managers to stop shooting themselves in the foot-and even a clueless sales manager can improve. Here are six ways that sales managers shoot themselves in the foot, and what you can do about it.

#1. They Adopt a “Sink or Swim” Mentality

You could hire the 10 best sales reps in the nation, but if you adopt a “sink or swim” mentality most of them are going to fail.

Success in one company does not necessarily predict success in another. Every company is different. Every product is different. Every process is different.

Yet far too many sales managers simply fling their presentation book and territory maps at new hires and say, “Go get ‘em, Tiger!”

Instead, you should take the time to figure out your sales process, from prospecting clear up until the customer installs or receives the product. Dig in to find best practices. Train them on a specific presentation. Give each sales rep a proven road map that can lead them to success over and over again-even if that rep was Mr. Sales Superstar in some other division or company.

And yes, if no such process currently exists then it will be up to you to create one.

#2. They Give Useless Advice

“Mr. Sales Manager, I want to hit quota but I don’t know how.”

“Just make more calls.”

Right now that conversation is being repeated over and over again across America. And it’s leaving a trail of frustrated sales reps and frustrated sales managers in its wake.

Assume your representatives want to succeed, and then figure out what’s standing in their way. Are they calling the right people? Is there something going on with their delivery when they call? The “numbers game” is a good starting point for sales success, but it’s not the end all, be-all. Stop assuming the problem is laziness or some other personal failing on the part of your reps and start positioning yourself as a coach and mentor.

#3. They Mistake “Rah-Rah” Huddles for Motivation

Having a positive attitude is certainly important. But cheering huddles, sales contests, and motivational posters are all surface solutions that don’t get to the heart of what it takes to create and maintain a positive attitude.

In reality, having a positive attitude comes from:

Knowing where you’re going.
Knowing why you’re going there.
Knowing you know how to get there.

Helping sales reps see where they are going is more than setting quotas. It’s also a matter of setting clear expectations for conveying the company brand, for achieving the right level of customer service, and for achieving certain success tasks such as setting appointments.

The “why” is about helping the representatives see the personal benefits of meeting those targets-helping them truly see what that level of income means to them and helping them place themselves inside of that picture. However, most employees want meaning, too, so why also comes from the company’s mission-what it’s trying to achieve and why the rep’s work matters.

But the third ingredient is the most important-how. There is nothing motivational about, “You can do it!” There is an incredible amount of motivation in “You can do it, and here’s how!” Give people action steps. Cheer for their actual successes, instead of slapping on a “we’re great” Band-Aid first thing in the morning. The Band-Aid solution is a hollow solution, and everyone knows it.

#4. They Develop an Antagonistic Relationship with the Marketing Department

Marketing is not the problem. Marketing is not delivering crappy leads. Turning the marketing department into a scapegoat doesn’t achieve anything except the breakdown of communications. The relationship should be symbiotic-they create leads, and you turn them into money.

Instead, see if you can work with marketing to determine the best, most profitable leads. Dig into the data with them. Find out what they’re doing so that you can incorporate their messaging into your sales presentations, allowing you both to present a consistent brand. Help them out by communicating the pain points, questions, and objections that your team encounters in the field-this is information that will help them create better marketing materials.

#5. They Spend All Their Time Putting Out Fires

Of course it’s important to be there for your team and to give them the tools they need to succeed. But resist the urge to solve every problem for your reps.

A recent post in “Top Line Leadership” put it pretty succinctly.

A sales manager who is reactive is one who is constantly fighting fires. And these “fires” are likely the same problems they were struggling with last month, too. The core problem that many sales managers have is the flawed mindset that, “I am 100% responsible for solving all team problems.”

So, salespeople hand-off their problems to their manager. Problems in customer service, order entry, you name it. They all get dumped in the sales manager’s lap. In extreme cases, a sales manager can take on the role of an administrative assistant to the team. I ask sales managers: “Do you ever wonder what your salespeople are doing after they give you their problems?” Here’s a hint: they’re likely not making more sales calls!

Adopt a different approach instead of taking every single problem into your own two hands. Give your reps some guidance on how they might solve the problem. Empower them to seek solutions. Let them know you’re always available for guidance-which takes a few minutes-but you’re not always available to spend 2 hours on the phone with another department sorting out the delivery snarl. That’s their job. Your job is to be the coach-to teach sales representatives how to succeed.

A close relative of this phenomenon is the sales manager who is spending all of his time going out on calls with representatives. That might be appropriate when the representative is very new, or when the rep is struggling and you’re attempting to pinpoint the problem, but it’s probably not the best use of your time otherwise. You certainly shouldn’t be taking over sales calls-that’s demotivating in the extreme, and it prevents you from working effectively.

Of course, all of this can be boiled down to a single problem, really-each of these failures is a result of a sales manager’s misunderstanding of his or her job. You’re not there to do the rep’s job for them. You’re not there to write reports and projections-they are part of the job, but they are not the job.

You’re the teacher, the coach, the leader. You’re there to inspire and to help change and correct the representative’s course when he starts to waver. You’re there to show your team the way so that they can be successful.

Can Your Superstar Sales Person Become Your Superstar Sales Manager

Finding the right person to fill the sales management role is a common quandary in wholesale distribution. It can be especially challenging when a decision is based strictly on sales territory performance without regard for the specific skill sets required to lead a sales force.. 2005 has been a good year in wholesale distribution with some industries recording double digit growth rates. With market cooperation like that, most sales people are smiling as they hit or exceed their quotas. Deciding on the right sales person to promote to sales manager can become a difficult and risky decision..

“We need a new sales manager. Let’s promote Tommy, he’s our leading producer in field sales.”

“No! We can’t afford to lose Tommy’s production in the field.”

“That’s not a problem. He can be a working sales manager and still call on his key accounts.”

Most of us should recognize that conversation but not many of us recognize the fallacies that lie within it. In wholesale distribution, it seems that the primary prerequisite for becoming a sales manager is being the top performing sales person. Promoting our top performing sales person to sales manager simply due to results is a big mistake. Personal experience tells me it has less than a forty percent chance for success. Our chance of success is decreased even further if we really believe that our sales manager can manage the sales force and still be solely responsible for a number of high volume accounts.

Different Skill Sets

It is an undisputable fact that different skill sets are required to become a successful sales manager as compared to being a successful sales person. Selling is a profession that requires professionals. Managing a group of professionals with the type of personalities required to succeed in sales is no easy task. Yet, in my humble opinion, it is probably the most important management position you can hold in a company. Sales management holds the key to meeting company objectives. Effective sales management builds the platform for success. Sales people are not the easiest group in the company to manage. If they were they would not be sales people. Selling is not easy. It takes a special talent, self motivation, self discipline, a passion to succeed and the ability to accept rejection. The reality of the situation is simple. The majority of sales people are not managed well. Let’s look at some common sales management mistakes to help us develop the list of hints I promised that will increase your ability to determine which sales person at your company is likely to succeed as sales manager.

Mistake —– Low tolerance for process.

Let’s face it, there probably isn’t a sales person alive that likes paperwork and administrative tasks. However, a Super Star Sales Manager will be process oriented. They understand that success in sales is driven by best practice and best practice is built around process. Sales effectiveness depends on predictable and repeatable best practice. The Super Star Sales Manager will create the kind of culture that negates the inherent aberration by sales people for process, structure, detailed and documented action planning.

HINT #1

If your star sales person embraces structure, pays attention to detail, is always current with required communications, documents his action planning process and doesn’t whine about administrative requirements passed down by corporate, chances are he/she will have a high tolerance for process. This means he/she possesses a basic understanding of structure and accountability. Everything isn’t locked up in their head just because they have been doing it a long time and have had great success.

Mistake —– Weak coaching and mentoring skills

Relationship equity is still a primary ingredient for sales success. However, relationship equity with the customer is quite different than relationship equity with peers, subordinates and executive management. A Super Star Sales Manager will build enough relationship equity with their sales force to be able to provide effective coaching and mentoring in reviewing the sales person’s activities. They understand that you must manage activities and measure results. This coaching and mentoring process includes buddy calls, monthly territory reviews that provide support and resources to leverage individual sales talent. This process includes opportunity recognition and pipeline management. What does the sales person have in the pipeline? Can the sales manager provide proactive support and resources to increase the chance of success?

Hint #2

If your star sales person is reluctant to accept or seek out help, this may be an indication of the Lone Wolf methodology. Maximizing territory performance requires a team effort. Utilization of all resources and support is mandatory to grow market share and maximize profitability. Look for the sales person that is successful but recognizes that they are not alone. Look for the sales person that shares the credit for success, coaches the inside sales staff, recognizes the contributions of customer service personnel and others in the organization. This sales person has also gained the respect of his peers and is often seen giving advice and sharing ideas.

Mistake —- Lack of development programs and leadership skills training

Leadership skills are extremely important to effective sales management. This is especially true when managing a sales force that leans more to the route mentality, is in a comfort zone, becomes complacent or is focusing on demand fulfillment as opposed to demand creation. The ability to recognize the need to adapt your management style not only to the situation but also to the individual is a key to gaining respect and trust from the sales force. This is a learned skill. Failure to seek out leadership skills training can be detrimental to success. A prerequisite to success in sales management is the ability to recognize talent and develop that talent. A Super Star Sales Manager will recognize talent and is willing to help develop that talent to reach its highest potential. They also prune the garden effectively. This means they hire well but fire even better. Failure to formalize a development program for sales management is a big mistake.

Hint #3

If your star sales person is not interested in attending seminars, doesn’t listen to self development tapes and hasn’t read a sales book in the past year, chances are they believe they are as good as they are going to get. Look for the sales person that is willing to be away from his territory, sacrificing commissions to increase his individual knowledge. This is the type of sales person that is a sponge when it comes to continuing education in the fields of sales. This person not only seeks company sponsored training but is willing to invest his own money and time in self improvement activities. They have a philosophy of continuous self improvement striving to be the very best that they can be.

Mistake —- A Member of “The Lucky Territory Club”

Numbers alone don’t always tell the story. We need to analyze each individual success story. Just because a sales territory has performed well doesn’t automatically mean the sales person is a star. A ten percent sales growth sounds great but how good is it if the potential growth for that territory should be in the twenty or thirty per cent range. A ten percent sales growth in that territory sounds great but how good is it if the market in that territory actually grew by thirty percent and the sales person was in a comfort zone walking by opportunities daily.

Hint #4

When evaluating your star sales person for potential promotion, analyze the numbers thoroughly. Is the sales person the real reason for that territory success? Are the numbers as good as they appear when you consider all the factors? Determine how this territory was established. Is this sales person responsible for the long term growth of this territory or did they inherit it. Analyze new account development in this territory. Evaluate this sales persons prospecting skills. How many new accounts have been developed in the territory? What kind of penetration success has been demonstrated with existing accounts?

Hint #5

Look for the sales person that has the ability to think strategically. They are willing to sacrifice personal gain for the benefit of long term company success. (A rare quality). A sales person that may be a maverick and shoot from the hip occasionally but every risk they take is a calculated risk. Their personal objectives for territory performance are in alignment with the company’s strategic objectives in relationship to product development,, segmentation, vendor development and margin initiatives. Look for the sales person that has good communication skills internally, one that has learned to listen exceptionally well, a skill that often eludes some of the best sales personnel.

If you are ready to promote your star sales person to sales manager, pay attention to the hints listed in this article. If your star sales person measures up according to the factors discussed in this article, your chance of success increases dramatically. That means your Super Star Sales Person can become your Super Star Sales Manager. If they don’t measure up according to the hints discussed, look deeper into your sales organization for that sales manager or go outside the organization. There is no such thing as entitlement. Remember, different skill sets are required to be an effective sales manager.

High Performance Sales Driven By High Performance Sales Managers

Much is written about getting sales people to perform at the highest levels. There are countless sales training programs, books, blogs and webinars that focus on sales people as individual contributors.

All of this is powerful and critical for sales people, but the most important element in driving high sales performance in the organization is the sales manager. Sales manager’s have to provide the leadership, coaching and development to help sales people understand high performance and what they need to do to achieve the highest levels of performance.

Too many managers are poorly equipped to provide this leadership. They were outstanding sales people, now promoted into management. They don’t change their behavior but try to manage by being “super sales contributors.” This won’t work-the numbers overwhelm the sales manager-they fail. The team is demotivated-they fail.

There has to be a different way, something that leverages the experience of the manager, enabling them to grow the capabilities and performance of their sales teams.

Congratulations, You’re A New Manager!

When I moved into my first sales management job, I had the good fortune of working for a company that invested in training and developing sales managers. Unfortunately, in today’s environment, it seems like it’s more “Tag You’re It.” People are appointed to be sales managers, but have little or no training or coaching on how to be a high performing sales manager.

It’s not wonder most new sales managers fall back into their comfort zones, being great sales people. But now, they see they have to do it across a larger territory and with their people.

It’s impossible to do this, the numbers are simply against the sales manager. Think of this example, as a top performing sales person, you consistently hit your annual $5M quota, sometimes you over achieved it. But you were constantly busy, never having any surplus time to sit back or hit the golf course. The job took 50, 60 or more hours a week, but you did it and excelled.

Now, poof, you’re a sales manager. You’re managing 10 people, each with $5M quotas. Your immediate reaction is to do what you did well in the past – doing deals. Now you have to do it for $50M, not just $5M. Sure you have sales people that can “help you out,” but after all, your past success was based on your personal abilities, and you were the best sales person. So the tendency is to get the sales people to do the trivial task and you as “super sales manager” sweep in to do the major tasks for all the deals.

Funny, the number of hours a day, days per week hasn’t changed. In your old role, every waking hour was spent doing your $5M of deals, now you have the challenge of squeezing 10 times that amount into the same time (OK, sleep is overrated, you try to work 7×24). Soon you find yourself drowning, you have more work – and your team is delegating more upward. There are not enough hours in the day. You start crashing and failing.

The numbers simply go against the manager, you can’t continue doing the same things you did before (even with the support of your team). There are not enough hours in the day to achieve the $50M.

The next thing happens is you “lose” your team. They see you coming in and pushing them to the side. After all you know how to do it better than them, all they need to do is get out of the way – or maybe do those trivial tasks, leaving the critical calls to you. The team realizes you don’t value them, that you in fact are competing with them. They see no reason to drive their performance in the territory. They start delegating everything up to you. Their morale suffers, they don’t respect you – after all you aren’t helping them develop and you push them to the side.

Pretty soon you are all alone. You are in a situation that you cannot survive, you fail, your team fails, your management is pleased to try to find someone who can come in to “fix the mess.”

What’s A New Manager To Do?

The job of a sales manager is different from being an individual contributor. While your experience as an outstanding sales person can help you, it’s important to recognize it’s different.

The key thing a new sales manager needs to understand is their job is getting things done through their people! The sales manager will only be as effective as the combined efforts of their team. Getting the team to perform at the highest levels is the mark of great sales managers. This means shifting your behavior. Moving from being the individual contributor who “did the deals, ” to the manager that coaches, questions and probes their people, helping them be more effective in “doing the deals.” Great managers revel in their people’s success. They want to see each person perform at the highest levels. They focus on coaching and developing – at every opportunity.

Great management requires further shifts in behavior. It means managing the process, not the transactions. As sales people we focused on each transaction or deal. The sales manager can’t afford to manage each transaction – here, again, the numbers go against you. Take this example, each of your 10 sales people have 10 active deals they are working on (most I know have far more than this). Each week you spend 30 minutes reviewing each deal, micromanaging the strategy with your sales people. Reviewing 100 deals a week (do the math), means you are spending just 50 hours a week in reviewing and micromanaging deals. When do you have time to make customer calls, do forecasts, do any of the other 100′s of things expected of management.

Sales Managers can’t possibly be involved in the transactions. The ony way to manage performance is to make certain you have a strong sales process in place and that your sales people are executing the process as effectively and efficiently as possible. Now your job becomes more manageable. If you review 2-3 deals per sales person, and you see they are “in control” of the process, then you can expect the others will probably be in control as well.

There are many other things involved in being a great manager. However, the foundation is based on these two elements: 1. the job of the sales manager is to get things done through their people, and 2. great sales managers manage the process not the transactions.

When Selecting a Sales Manager, Good Is Better Than Best

It has been the accepted practice for decades that the best performing sales representatives are the ones most likely to be promoted to sales management positions.

Coincidentally, if you were to ask sales executives to evaluate this practice, most assuredly nearly all would reply that two things happen — neither of which is good!

First and foremost, a high performing sales person is taken out of play, so the team loses a great salesperson.

Secondly, the former high performing sales person usually turns out to be an average or mediocre manager, so the team loses again. Sometimes the company loses because many times the former high performer, now less than average manager, will find employment elsewhere.

Some of the cause for this outcome is the fact that companies tend to spend a great deal of time and money on technical and product training for sales representatives, but spend little or no time and money on leadership and management training. Leadership and management skills and leadership abilities should be the qualifying actions and requirements before promoting any sales representative to manager.

The practice of promoting the high performer continues throughout all business enterprises in the United States. The practice is based on two assumptions. It is assumed that promoting a high performer is the right thing to do as a reward for success. And highly successful sales representatives will be good leaders.

The former may have some merit, but the latter is clearly neither a sensible or logical conclusion. As suggested in the opening paragraphs, a high performing sales record does not assure the ability to lead. There is much evidence to support this assertion.

Professional sports teams are great examples. Many former professional baseball, basketball, and football players became or are now Head Coaches or Team Managers. Only a few of them were top performers. Some were good performers, and many others were just solid players. After all, anyone who is on a professional team is head and shoulders above us ordinary people, but not all of the extraordinary are super-stars. There are those who are the elite within the elite.

Generally, the superstars who become coaches or managers are not usually great managers or coaches. There are exceptions. Bill Russell comes to mind as a good example of a superstar who was a highly successful coach. His teammate K.C. Jones was a very good player who was probably an even better manager.

The former players who become successful Head Coaches and Team Managers were usually good players, but not superstars.

Phil Jackson is an example. Who would have thought that the “Human Coat Hanger” as an off-the-bench player for the Knicks would become the “Zen Master” and highly successful Head Coach of both the Bulls and the Lakers winning many national championships for the two teams.

Another example is Tony LaRussa. He retired after winning another World Series with the Cardinals and he will go the Baseball Hall of Fame as a Manager, not a player in the major leagues.

Most former professional football players who have gone on to being a successful Head Coaches were not superstars. On the other hand, not many professional football superstars became successful head coaches.

How does this apply to selecting a sales manager? Here’s how.

Sales reps are very competitive and often have huge egos. That’s okay. Those are traits that benefit the execution of their craft. Top performers like superstar athletes have high expectations not only of themselves, but also of all the others on the team.

The professional players who were less than superstars know that everyone on the team has a contribution to make, so their expectations are not for everyone to be a superstar, but for everyone to contribute to the team as expected.

This is the single most significant reason why the non-superstars make better coaches and managers. While the fact remains that everyone on a professional sports team is part of an elite group, there are those among the elite who are more elite. The latter group often does not relate well to the former group.

And this is why the top sales performer most likely will not be a good sales manager or leader. The top performer’s expectations are likely to be too high. The top performer expects that everyone else on the team will share his drive, his discipline, his methods, and his zeal. That expectation is unrealistic.

It is not uncommon for a previously top-performing sales person, now promoted to manager, to affect what I call the Clark Kent syndrome. The syndrome often engages when the superstar manager meets with customers along with a territory sales representative. When the former top gun salesperson perceives the territory sales rep to be floundering or slipping up before the customer, the new manager will not hesitate to push the territory rep aside and take over the situation in much the same manner as Clark Kent would rip away his shirt and tie revealing the big Superman S.

This action may “save the day”, but once again at least two things happen that are both bad. The customer begins to lose confidence in the sales rep, and the customer will likely contact the Sales Manager, rather than the sales representative, when the next issue arises.

On the other hand, the good performer turned manager is likely to understand the importance of supporting the local sales person rather than being Superman.

I instructed the Sales Managers reporting to me to not only stay in the background, but also to not give the customer a business card. I told the Sales Managers to give any excuse they could to the customer for not having a business card, but to assure the customer that the local rep would be in contact if needed. There was no way we wanted to the customer to circumvent the local sales person as it happens sometimes.

Good performers, who are promoted to sales manager, usually understand the dynamics of the team and the contribution of the individual members to the team. The good performer turned manager usually knows how to motivate and to stimulate the strengths of each individual on the team to produce and to contribute because someone probably treated them that way or they knew they couldn’t do it all themselves like superstars tend to think at times. The expectations of a good performer now manager are likely to be both grounded and directed to achieving team goals and objectives rather than individual goals. And perhaps the most beneficial trait of the good performer, now manager is that the competitive nature of his team members will be channeled towards competitors rather than between or among fellow team members.

Leadership is the essential component. Leadership manifests itself in many ways. One should expect a manager to be a leader, but not all leaders on a team are managers. Top performers are expected to be role models and to lead by example. Whether it is habits, discipline, planning, organization, appearance, or temperament, the top performers must be role models.

Sales Managers must be more than role models. They must be leaders.

Sales Managers must be visible and not hidden behind a desk. At the same time, Sales Managers are not the person on the white horse leading the charge. Good leaders are those who work alongside their team and who let each team member know the value of the role each plays as part of the team.

Leaders are not just a “pretty face” or a “fast talker”. Charisma is not leadership. Many charismatic personalities have the ability to draw people to them, but often have nowhere to lead those drawn.

Leaders understand that front-line sales personnel are not “cannon fodder” or some other dispensable tool. On the contrary the front-line sales teams are indispensable to achieving the business objectives of the organization.

Leaders are not just bosses who tell team members what to do. Bosses capitalize on power that generates limited success and generally leads to disgruntled, lifeless, and dispirited team members. Leaders stimulate and encourage team members to do their part in the whole scheme of the company goals.

And perhaps most important of all, leaders do not view kindness and appreciation as something weak or beneath them. Leaders know that positive reinforcement may be the most powerful leadership tool there is. Leaders recognize the value of telling team members that they have done a good job or showing thanks for what they have done.

How To Make Money Using an Udemy Online Teaching Course

A few decades ago, it was hard to find a good teacher. The only option that you had was to look for one in your area because the Internet was not available at that time. Nowadays, the internet has made it a lot easier to learn from the comfort of home. If you have been thinking of taking a certain course to hone your skills, we suggest that you check out Udemy. Let’s find out how people make money on Udemy by launching courses through websites. Read on to know more.

What Is Udemy?

Basically, this platform brings both students and teachers together. As a matter of fact, Udemy is one of the top platforms for online courses. It offers a lot of free tools and support for instructors to develop courses and make money from them.

Udemy allows anyone to create a course and offer it to everyone across the globe through its platform. Nowadays, the platform has more than 15 million students from more than 190 countries. Moreover, it has courses in more than 80 languages.

Launching a Course

If you want to submit a course on Udemy, you may want to follow the steps below. We will talk about each step in detail so you can get started without any problem.

Sign up

First of all, you may want to go to the home page of Udemy and sign up for an account, which will cost you nothing. As soon as you have signed up, you can access tons of free as well as paid courses.

Course creation

After signing up, you can hit the “Teaching” button. The “Create a course” button will show up that you can press to create a course and become a tutor.

Udemy revenue model

For course creation, Udemy won’t charge you any fee. On the other hand, for selling, you do have to consider the revenue model offered by the platform. Let’s find out more about the revenue model.

Instructor promotion

After a lead generation, the entire revenue goes to the course instructor. For instance, if a lead is generated through the coupon code given by the course creator, the instructor will get the revenue.

Organic traffic

If the course buyer comes to the platform through organic traffic, 50% of the revenue will go to the course creator. And the rest will go to the website. So, there is a lot of money to be made even if you don’t use other means to get the word about your courses.

Other revenue sharing model

This revenue sharing ratio can be between 25% and 97%. Actually, the ratio is based on the fact whether the customer comes to the platform via deals, ads or affiliates. So, based on these factors, the revenue can be more or less.

Resources for Udemy

Udemy helps you throughout the process. Whether you are going to create a course or you want to promote, the platform has resources for you. Udemy offers tons of free resources that help you make your course a success. As a matter of fact, the free resources on this platform are on the list of the best advantages of Udemy, as they help you make money from your course without too much struggle.

So, if you have been thinking of creating a course and publishing it on Udemy, we suggest that you take into account the advice given in this article. Just make sure your course is interesting and it can help your students learn new things. And that’s all you need in order to sell your courses and make a lot of money.

Ideal Solutions To Success Online

If you have ever spent time looking for ideal solutions to success online, you could find yourself very frustrated. You found that there are basic ways to succeed in this line of work. You know that online work isn’t hard, physical labor. Working online is easy in that there isn’t a lot of physical work involved. People who work hard as builders, factory workers, office personnel and in administration, must work hard and produce good results or they no longer have a job. Online work isn’t hard physically. However, it takes tenacity, perseverance, and a little knowledge to be successful. Perhaps herein lies part of your annoyance. Let’s look at some things that bring frustration into your ideal online performance. The items are not listed in any particular order of difficulty or ordered frustration levels.

Number 1, Building a Website

The number one thing that frustrates many people and keeps them from being successful online is building a website. This one thing kept me from being successful online years ago. When you find the right training building a website can be really easy. You don’t have to know HTML to build one today. You can learn how to make a website at certain locations on the Internet. There are places where you can learn how to make a free website.

Number 2, Finding a Domain Name

The best way to relieve frustration from finding a domain name is to first find the niche you want to promote. The name of your site needs to match the niche you have chosen. So, the way you keep this from being frustrating is to identify your niche, and then write a list of 10 to 15 names that describe your niche. It’s like choosing a title for a book, the title must tell what the book is about. Same with your domain name. It must tell what your niche is about. I prefer to stick with a .com. It’s just a personal preference that you don’t have to adhere to.

Number 3, Getting Site Ready

Until you learn, getting your site ready for search engine optimization can be really frustrating. Actually, it can be next to impossible if you don’t have the proper training. Again, I have a page for you to review that explains the ins and outs of preparing your site for SEO. Again, you can write articles, use social media such as Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest. The big question you need to ask is, “Where are you going to get the training and knowledge on how to make these ideas work for you?”

Number 4, Getting Traffic

The number one goal for any marketing site is to drive traffic to it. There are many ways to do this, but the only way I choose to do this is by writing good content for my website. What if you can’t write, or at least you think you can’t? Many sites offer training on how to write.The training on a few sites is phenomenal. Every bit of the training is to help you build a site, monetize it and then drive traffic to it. You can learn so many ideas on what to write that you will never run out of something to write about. Getting traffic is almost done for you. All you have to do is follow directions.

Number 5, Training

Before I found a helpful site, training was my nemesis. The lack of training defeated me every time and cost me money. The training I have gotten has given me a handle on success. I have learned how to succeed because I have been trained well. Following are a few things I have been able to find online:

Certification Courses: 5 Levels

1. Getting Started

2. Build Your own Traffic Producing Website

3. Making Money!

4. Mastering Social Engagement

5. Achieving Maximum Success Through Content Creation

Each level has several courses and the training available to make you successful! I repeated most of the lessons. Some were simple but needed more exploring. Others were new to me and my then limited expertise. I can’t believe how much knowledge is packed into these lessons. Yet the progress from one step to the next is given in easy steps for those who aren’t technologically proficient when they begin the courses.

You Get All the Training

Every site that I tried before this would promise they could teach me how to be successful. What they taught me was that I needed to hire a group of professional online gurus to help me build a successful online business. I paid good money to learn this, too. Their ads said that even a monkey could learn how to use their program. I guess that I’m not as smart as a monkey because I couldn’t begin to understand what they were trying to teach me. “You’ll never believe how easy it is to make money online,” their ads read. I learned the hard way, out of pocketbook hard way, that paper will lie still and let you write anything on it. At least the paper they wrote on did! I was never able to follow more than the first couple steps. Not nearly enough to learn anything. However, all that has changed now. Since I found this site, I have learned how to be successful online. All I’ve done since I’ve been here is grow and grow. That’s where I am. That was what I was looking for in the first place. Can I tell you that I found a place where you can work at your pace, make the amount of money you want to make, and work when and where you want to.

Work for Yourself

The best boss you will ever have is YOU. Working for yourself online doesn’t require lots of energy. You don’t have to have a specific location where you go to work. With today’s technological advances, you can work from nearly anywhere. I prefer to work at home with my family nearby. That’s where you can find yourself, too. Are you ready for the change? Are you ready to be your own boss? Then don’t wait! Visit me to begin today!